Chronology

1930:

Born Lower Merion, PA, April 2.


1938:

Family move to Pittsfield, MA.


1944-48:

Darrow School, New Lebanon, NY. Former Shaker settlement turned preparatory school for boys. Turns my wayward earlier daydreamer days into a graduating co-valedictorian. Shades of Albert in Zurich - don't I wish


Virginia Military Institute. First year: Civil Engineering; second year: Humanities.

1948-50:


Yale University, School of Art & Architecture, under Josef Albers. Yale Summer School at Norfolk, 1953 BFA 1954.

1950-54:


Yale University Traveling Fellowship Grant. Year of informal travel in Europe, mainly Italy and France. Meet Nadia Boulanger in Fountainbleu and study music in Paris. Painting derivations of Cezanne.

1954-55:


Residence in New Haven. Still painting derivations of Cezanne. Subsisting by lettering store sale signs and selling Good Humor ice cream.

1956-57:


Patience with dead-beat life and derived painting waning. Become Assistant Registrar at Yale Art Gallery and shift to sculpture, now derivative of Henry Moore and Jacques Lipschitz.

1958:


Apprenticing as art teacher at Hamden Hall, grades 2-7, and as art history lecturer at University of Bridgeport. Back to painting, now non-objective, derivative of Stuart Davis.

1959:


Return to Yale University. Assistant teacher in Drawing. Painting now trying to be "action," muscular and generally macho. Prints begin to attract me as the macho world of painting and the New York art scene frustrates and dismays me. Print world seems more of an undiscovered island. The first lift-ground print is of a single tree.

1960:


Yale MFA. Marry Edith Cohn, June, in New Haven.

1961:


Instructor in Basic Design, Drawing and Color, Maryland Institute, Baltimore.

1961-68:


Tested for red and green color blindness at Johns Hopkins University. I am totally taken aback at degree of deficiency. Black-and-white prints from now on! Instructive that my Josef Albers based color course was getting such strong results. Shows the strength of the Bauhaus master's methods.

1962:


First one-man show of graphics, Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA. Birth of son, Jeremy, December.

1963:


Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant in Graphics. Enter first all-print exhibition, Boston Printmakers' 16th Annual Exhibition with PANORAMA 1. Birth of daughter, Naomi, December.

1964:


Compulsively enter every graphics exhibition possible. Jeremy, Naomi, & Baltimore architectural motifs become main subject. Astonished to win 16 awards in 1966 with STREET SCENE and GARDEN. Greed for prizes flourishes briefly, then begins to wane. Enthusiasm for exhibiting in general begins to fade.

1964-69:


Move to rural Francestown, New Hampshire, having given up teaching for a year. Converted barn hayloft becomes studio and escape is complete. JOLLY CORNER SUITE and experimenting with uv sensitive resists begun. Receive first prize, IX Festival de Artes Graficas, Cali, Colombia, invited as juror to X Festival, and given first one-man show outside of United States.

1969:


Accept last formal teaching post, as instructor of graphics, Yale Summer School of Music and Art at Norfolk. Start working with Robert Townsend, the intaglio printer of my editions ever since. I continue to do all my own proofing.

1970:


Visiting Artist, Dartmouth College. JOLLY CORNER SUITE published by Aquarius Press, Baltimore.

1971:


Grand Prize, International Biennial of Prints in Seoul, Korea. One-man exhibition, Corcoran Gallery of Art. Visiting Artist, Yale University.

1972:


Beginning to find exhibiting as distracting as was teaching. Wonder if I am becoming a complete eccentric. The irony of non-exhibiting artist not entirely lost on me.

1973:


First one-man show in Europe, Galerie Georges Bernier, Paris.

1975:


Impressions Workshop, Boston, publishes first catalog raisonné: Peter Milton: Complete Etchings 1960-1976.

1977:


Two concurrent exhibitions organized by International Exhibitions Foundation, Washington, DC. Travel to over forty cities.

1977-81:


Visiting Artist, Yale University.

1979:


After eighteen years of concentrated printmaking, decide to undertake discreet midlife crisis by leaving prints.  Start two-year Stolen Moments graphite on drafting film drawing project.  The Jolly Corner Suite published in book form, Terra Nova Editions, London.  Publication Exhibition, Francis Kyle Gallery, London.  Visiting Artist, Columbia University.

1980:


Visiting Artist, Middlebury College, VT.

1981:


Under grant from Australian Council for the Arts, conduct printmaking workshop in Hobart, Tasmania.  Lectures in Melbourne and Sydney.

1982:


Drawing splurge has run its course. Discomfort with the idea of the specialized printmaker still gnaws.  Concern about color blindness thrown to the winds -- start eight-foot canvas on Les Belles et la Bête theme.  Artist-in-Residence, Dartmouth College.

1983:


Realization dawns that one painting a year doth not a prolific career make: painting The Rehearsal has taken a year.  Sail back to port and printmaking.  Interiors series begins with Family Reunion.

1984:


Visiting Artist, University of Florida, Gainsville; State University of New York at Purchase; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence.

1985:


Lecturer in series on contemporary printmaking, Yale University.

1988:


Interiors series nearing end with six images completed.  My thoughts turn toward a new James project, The Aspern Papers.  After the measured pace of Interiors, I feel the need for a profusion of images and return to drawings.

1989:


Six weeks residence at Rockefeller Center, Bellagio, Italy.  A Dream period, Lake Como is the perfect for setting the mood for The Aspern Papers'  Italian ambience.  Visit Venice and find the disintegrating palazzo which is James's setting for the story.

1990:


The Aspern Papers interrupted to complete INTERIORS series with its seventh image, The Train from Munich.

1991:


The Aspern Papers is published, David R. Godine, Boston.  Original eight-image project is now eighteen drawings and one print.  Publication exhibition of the drawings, Mary Ryan Gallery, NY.

1993:


Drawing show travels to Louis Newman Galleries, Los Angeles, Edith Caldwell Gallery, San Francisco, and the More Gallery, Philadelphia.  The Primacy of Touch, a catalogue raisonné of drawings published by Hudson Hills Press, NY.  Begin the "Millennium Series" with Points of Departure I: Mary's Turn, and Points of Departure II: Nijinsky Variations.

1994:


Nijinsky Variations finished, after what seems like a millennium itself.  Peter Milton: Complete Prints 1960-1996 published by Chronicle Books, San Francisco.  Two weeks in Venice.  Tintoretto and Tiepolo. I ponder Renaissance ideal of universal appeal in art has gone from highest priority to lowest.  Duchamp rules.

1996:


We move to Santa Monica for winters and grandson.  Frances town remains primary residence -- I can never leave the gardens: my little Giverney sans water lilies. Retrospective exhibitions at Currier Museum, Susquehanna Art Museum, Austrian Embassy in Washington.

1997:


My printer, Robert Townsend, encourages me towards color prints, but my red/green problem haunts the project. Frustration trumps wishful thinking and I flee. Reassured by retrospective at the De Young Museum, in San Francisco. Finish Twentieth Century Limited. An image for catastrophists.

1998:


Pavane completes Points of Departure series.  Artist-in-Residence, Pasadena City College.  Talks at the Getty for the Degas photographic exhibition. Suppress the urge to be as annoying to Degas as Degas was to everyone else.

1999:


Always the pessimist, am amazed to have made it into a new century.  Curious to see how our "shiny new century will view all those cutting edges of a now retro century.

2000:


Finish Visions and Revisions. Very Belle Epoque, starting with J.S. Sargent but switching to Marcel Proust at encouragement of Francis Kyle, my London dealer to be shown in the National Theatre Exhibition for Harold Pinter’s play of Proust’s great novel.

2001:


Named to advisory committee by the US Bureau of Printing and Engraving for ongoing redesign of U.S. currency. Startled and delighted both that the engravers know my work and about this new twist on an artist "making money"

2002:


Alarmed that people are beginning to ask if I’m retired. ??? I respond that artists never retire.

2003:


Slide talk about The Ministry at centennial symposium for James Joyce Bloomsday celebration in Dublin, Ireland.

Finish Embarkation for Cythera, which was started in 2000 and discarded repeatedly. My main talent appears to be insane persistence.

2004:


Finish the second state of The Ministry. Finish Hidden Cities III: Continuum, an elaboration of the Galleria Vittorio Emmanuel in Milan.

Finish an extensive revision of Visions and Revisions, renamed In Search of Lost Time.

Has been an unnerving year of deadlines around the London show at Francis Kyle Gallery, the Krakow Triennial, Krakow, Poland and the 14th Seoul Space International Print Biennial, Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea.

2006:


Always the frustrated myopic and still searching for acuity denied, I take a desperate dive head first into the microcosm of the pixel. At first, in the free fall of a computer illiterate, I start a hair raising digital learning curve which gradually levels out into the sweet trajectory of a new series. Acuity regained.

2007:


Finished Sight Lines 1: Tracking Shot, my first digital image. Printed in both digital and intaglio version with a third on transparent film to be displayed in for a LED light box display.

Retrospective Exhibition, The Old Print Shop, New York, NY.

Participated in Icon-Data8 online gallery, Krakow Triennial, Krakow, Poland

2008:


Finish Dress Rehearsal, started as Sight Lines II, but reconfigured to stand alone. Digital print in two sizes. Planned gravure etching version problematical, abandoned. Actual Sight Lines II is started, focusing on the 1900's Parisian street photography of Eugene Atget.

Reviews single out prints both in: A new acquisitions show Pop to Present at Stanford University Cantor Art Center. And Evolution of a Shared Vision: The David and Barbara Stahl Collection, Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH.

Print biennial in Guanlan, China, triennial in Krakow, Poland.

Monograph included in 60 Years of American Prints, by David Acton, published by Boston Printmakers.

Pop to Present, Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

Talk: Portsmouth Art Center, Portsmouth, NH.

2009:


Budget collapse of a well advanced retrospective exhibition in the UK. at the Norman Rae Gallery, University of York, set to travel to Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

Panel and Exhibition: An Artists' Circle, Sharon Art Center. Peterborough NH.

2010:


Included in This Twittering World, a celebration by twenty contemporary artists of TS Eliots’s Four Quartets, Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK.

The Green Room is editioned both as a digital print and as a gravure etching.

Boston Printmakers Annual Show and talk, Jane Haslem Gallery, Washington DC.

2011:


Monograph included in A Natural History of Color and Vision, Philippe
Lanthony,  Éditions de la Martiniére.

Krakow Triennial, Krakow, Poland.

Lecture by James Heffernan, "Peter Milton's Turn" UNH Museum of Art, Durham, NH. Talk: UNH Museum of Art, Durham, NH.

National Academy Museum Annual Members Show, New York, NY.

2012:


Included in Jumping for Joyce: Contemporary painters revel in the world of James Joyce, Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK.

Two shows inclusions at National Academy Museum, New York: 61 Contemporary Printmakers and Visualizing Time:  A curated show of 35 prints from the museum collection.

Guanlan International Print Biennial, Guanlan, China.

2013:


Talk: Mc Gowan Fine Arts, Concord, NH. Round-table conference call session with Amherst College students, Mead Museum, Amherst, MA.

Real/Surreal, Childs Gallery, Boston, MA

Honored by SAGA (Society of American Graphic Artists).

Honored by the National Academy with an award for 39 years tenure as a National Academician.

The Old Print Shop shows a LED display of Eclipse at the New York City Print Fair.

Plans in the early stage for a 2016 exhibition of my prints, plates and LED displays at the Evergreen Museum and Library, John Hopkins University.

Interviewed by Angela Evancieas for part of the series Color Decoded: Stories That Span The Spectrum that aired on National Public Radio (NPR) on November 16, 2014. For One Artist, Colorblindness Opened Up A World Of Black And White

Online retrospectives of early prints at Davidson Galleries and Warnock Fine Arts.

2014:


Purchase Award, Society of American Graphic Artists Centennial Exhibition. The Art Students League, New York, NY

The Old Print Shop showcased LED versions of Tsunami and Hide and Seek at the International Fine Print Dealers Association Park Avenue Armory Print Fair.

2015:


Peter Milton: Living Old Master, Academy Art Museum, Easton, MD

Etching Enigmas, Johns Hopkins University Evergreen Museum, Baltimore, MD

2016:


2017: